Company Command Series Part X: Deployment Readiness

CO COC Pic

This blog post is a continuation of the multi-part Company Command Series covering key aspects of my command experience that I feel other commanders (current and future) can benefit from. This post discusses how to validate your company’s combat readiness and deployability so it is not a surprise when you are called upon to accomplish your mission.

My brigade commander continuously reminded my fellow company commanders and me that, “commanders generate readiness.” He felt so passionate about readiness that he included my capacity to maintain readiness in his senior rater comments in my OER. Readiness really is that important. I believe that equipment and personnel readiness should always be the top priority of a commander (at any level); without sufficient deployability, what are you bringing to the fight?

I believe company commanders can easily establish methods at their level to test and validate their company’s readiness. I can’t think of many things worse than being called to conduct a deployment readiness exercise (DRE) by a higher headquarters (let alone a real world short-notice deployment) where you boast a 95% combat power deployability, but only 60% of your equipment and personnel can leave the motor pool. Commanders generate readiness and it all starts with the company commander. Below are ideas to create a company-level DRE program. Not every DRE requires extensive time and resources; vary your DRE methods up to support your training calendar.  Continue reading → Company Command Series Part X: Deployment Readiness

Company Command Series Part IX: Troop Leading Procedures

CO COC Pic

 This blog post is a continuation of the multi-part Company Command Series covering key aspects of my command experience that I feel other commanders (current and future) can benefit from. This post discusses how to maximize operations and Troop Leading Procedures efficiency in your company.

With the often-overwhelming requirements placed on companies, coupled with continuous time constraints, it is hard to implement the Troop Leading Procedures (TLPs) in their entirety. Throughout my command, I often felt that my company and I should be doing more to maximize TLP effectiveness. This is why it is imperative that commanders and companies codify how to conduct TLPs and expectations throughout. This post introduces some aspects that made TLPs successful in my experience, and a few recommendations based on lessons learned. As with all content in these posts, these serve as options for commanders to consider and implement. I encourage readers to share their experiences and lessons in how to effectively leverage TLPs beyond this. Continue reading → Company Command Series Part IX: Troop Leading Procedures

Company Command Series Part III: Unit Training Management

CO COC Pic

This blog post is a continuation of the multi-part Company Command Series covering key aspects of my command experience that I feel other commanders (current and future) can benefit from. This post discusses Unit Training Management focused on battle rhythms.

Unit Training Management (UTM) is the systematic foundation of any military tactical-level unit. The quality of your UTM can make or break your command time. Maximizing your UTM systems is critical to your company’s overall effectiveness and efficiency. It also prevents wasting your leaders’ time with inefficient meetings (or too many meetings). Ultimately, it establishes predictability for your subordinates.

To build an effective UTM, start with a battle rhythm. Brainstorm with your leaders (I recommend 1SG, Operations Sergeant, XO, and PLT leadership teams) and identify what topics need to be reviewed in a meeting and how often. With those topics, put topic to calendar and assign a date-time group that works best for your company and is nested within battalion and brigade schedules. Minimize the number of meetings. Be critical in determining if certain topics actually require meeting. If so, look to group similar topics having minimal organizational impact in one meeting. I grouped my company supply meeting with our maintenance meeting; the bi-weekly supply meeting would immediately follow the company maintenance meeting on selected weeks to prevent an additional time my Platoon Leaders and XO needed to meet me in the conference room. Continue reading → Company Command Series Part III: Unit Training Management

Company Command Series Part II: Preparing for Command

CO COC Pic

This blog post is a continuation of the multi-part Company Command Series covering key aspects of my command experience that I feel other commanders (current and future) can benefit from. This post discusses a method to successfully prepare for command and how to map out your first 90 days.

Successfully preparing for command does not start with your change of command inventories. I argue it must start months before that with deliberate research, reflection, and goal development. Most military officer timelines include a season on brigade or battalion staff before command; that is the ideal time to initiate your preparation. Starting to think about and prepare for command during your change of command inventories is too late; by then, you will be quickly overwhelmed with property accountability, learning the company’s systems, meeting your troops, and the daily demands of a commander. I actually started my command preparation at the career course with specific research. Then, two months from starting my inventories, I began writing my command philosophy and policy memos. Based on my experience and on the ideas from other respected leaders prior to my command, I provide some recommendations on how to prepare for command to make your command assumption deliberate (not reactionary) and well-controlled.

Continue reading → Company Command Series Part II: Preparing for Command

A Leader’s Organization

evernote

Organizing your thoughts, tasks, and goals on a regular basis can be a daunting task in itself. Often, leaders and professionals have no single unifying framework that streamlines their efforts to stay organized and avoid merely treading water at work. During my almost seven years as a military leader, through multiple attempts in revolutionizing my organizational methods, I finally found success in this area: Evernote.

Continue reading → A Leader’s Organization